Awards Projects

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AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS

Redesign of AAE319: The International Agricultural Economy
Project head(s): Kyle W. Stiegert (Agricultural & Applied Economics)
Project:
To update and revise a course on international trade and investment as it pertains to international agribusiness. New curriculum will include four new case studies. Course topics will include: international policies regarding food safety and regulations; issues around biotechnology industries (such as international trade in genetically modified organisms), patterns and trends in foreign direct investments by agribusiness multinationals; the role of the World Trade Organization in agricultural trade; the impacts of regional trade organizations; the influence of risk management in commodity price and exchange rates; and the practice of food retailing by large multinationals.
Course(s) impacted:
3-credit AAE319: The International Agricultural Economy
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an appreciation of the added complexities of conducting business internationally specifically as it pertains to food and agriculture; 2) learn about how the WTO policy, policy dispute mechanisms, and regional free trade zones function and what that means for agricultural businesses; 3) develop critical thinking skills for understanding the role of agricultural trade in confronting and/or exasperating issues such as world poverty, hunger, and environmental degradation, 4) develop skills for writing case studies that thoroughly address international economic issues associated with food and agricultural industries.

Integrating Learn@UW into AAE373: Globalization, Development, and Poverty
Project head(s): Brad Barham (Agricultural & Applied Economics); John Hoffmire (Center of Business and Poverty, Wisconsin School of Business)
Project: To produce and implement a blended learning component (specifically a Learn@UW site) for a UW-Madison course on globalization, development, and poverty offered at Oxford University during the summer of 2012. The online component will provide the nearly 40 UW-Madison students (mostly freshmen) who have enrolled in this course with an individualized, student-driven means of identifying and processing the cultural aspects of their experience.
Global learning outcomes: Student will demonstrate: 1) increased critical thinking skills and an ability to solving problems related to travel and living in a foreign context; 2) enhanced communication skills including the open discussion of culturally sensitive ideas and tolerance for different points of view; 3) progress in building international career competencies and the ability to articulate those competencies

Reynolds with lobstersStrengthening the International Component of the Course Cooperatives, Agricultural and Applied Economics 323
Project head(s): Anne Reynolds (Center for Cooperatives and Agricultural and Applied Economics)
Project: To research and develop a two-week classroom module on cooperatives in Costa Rica to be integrated into an existing course that introduces students to the cooperative business model, including: economics; finance and governance of cooperatives; the impact of cooperatives in sectors like agriculture, utilities and finance; and cooperative management.
This module will allow for a comparison of policy, democratic traditions, and the economic environment in the development of cooperatives in U.S. and Costa Rica.
The multi-day, interactive module will ask students assume the roles of various stakeholders in a Costa Rican cooperative. On the final day, members of the local cooperative community (e.g. Just Coffee or Spring Rose Growers Cooperative) will visit to demonstrate the linkages between the issues faced by U.S. and international cooperatives.
Course(s) impacted: Agricultural and Applied Economics 323: Cooperatives
Global learning outcomes: Students will: 1) gain an understanding of the linkages between U.S. and global cooperatives; and 2) gain an understanding the comparative context of cooperative development and success. This includes governmental politics, the economic environment, and democratic traditions.

ANIMAL SCIENCES

Farming in MexicoUnderstanding Sustainability: The Economic, Environmental, and Social Outcomes of Family Farms in Jalisco, Mexico. 
Project head(s): Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)
Project: To develop and implement an online, interactive case study that will provide students with a “real world” scenario of farm management in Jalisco state. The scenario will emphasize the manage of the whole farm system, including socio-economic factors, rather than the management of specific farm components. The case will help students explore ways to improve management practices of livestock (dairy) operations based on a sound understanding of balance and flow of nutrients as a continuum among the soil, plants, and animals that make up the biophysical resources of a farm.
Course(s) impacted: Dairy Science/Animal Sciences/Soil Science/Environmental Studies 468: Environmental Management of Livestock Operations
Global learning outcomes: Students will be expected to demonstrate an increased awareness and understanding of: 1) contrasting roles and contributions of livestock agriculture in Mexico and the U.S.; 2) the factors that impact the management of a whole farm. They will also gain: 1) an increased ability for integrative learning and an appreciation of the scientific tools used in different countries to assess the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, including indicators of human and animal health; 2) a capacity for inquiry, analysis, and problem solving in sustainable agriculture, and; 3) higher levels of motivation and interest in seeking out additional opportunities to engage further in studies (and experiential learning) of international agricultural issues.

Integration of International Scientific Research and Exchange of Multiple Cultural Perspectives to Meet the Challenges of Avian Conservation
Project head(s): Mark E. Berres (Animal Sciences)
Project: To develop a new undergraduate course in ornithology and to develop and integrate a case study of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole. The newly developed course, Animal Sciences 375: Advance Topics in Ornithology, will provide a seminar of undergraduates with in-depth exposure to a specific avian conservation research topic, that of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole.
Using audio data recorded on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles, students will analyze the specific calls, communicate with the scientific research staff at the Montserrat Division of Environment (DoE) and with key members of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, and then map distributional trends using GIS software.
Ultimately students will make conservation recommendations taking into account, among other things, the unique culture found on Montserrat.
These students will then create a 50-minute, multimedia-rich synopsis of the project and present it during one regularly scheduled lecture to students enrolled in Animal Sciences/Zoology 520 and 521.
Course(s) impacted: Animal Sciences/Zoology 520: Ornithology; Animal Sciences/Zoology 521: Birds of Southern Wisconsin; and a new course, Animal Sciences 375: Advanced Topics in Ornithology
Global learning outcomes: A strategic outcome from these interactions will be an ability to identify—and accommodate—differences in the way researchers from three different countries work together toward a common goal.

Mexico extensionIntegration of Global Issues in the Animal Sciences Classroom: Reproductive Physiology
Project head(s): John Parrish (Animal Sciences)
Project: To develop and integrate a series (between 6 and 12) of case studies that focus on agricultural and wildlife management in Mexico for Animal Sciences 434: Reproductive Physiology. Two to four case studies will be developed based on situations in Mexico in each of these three subjects: endocrinology, control of female cycles, and problems during pregnancy. Real life cases are being developed in cooperation with experts in Mexican agriculture and wildlife management. Cases will be presented in Spanish to simulate direct communication with someone in Mexico. Using translation software, students will take into account social and economic conditions to solve the cases. They will then make a website and podcast of their solution to present to the class.
Course(s) impacted: Animal Sciences 434: Reproductive Physiology
Global learning outcomes: The global learning outcomes of the proposed work are to increase: 1) critical thinking skills and application to solving problems related to a foreign country; 2) communication skills and, in particular, strategies to communicate in a language other than English, and; 3) appreciation of ethical issues in global agriculture and wildlife management as they relate to reproduction manipulation. The overall impacts we expect to have on students include: 1) understanding how theory applies to application in the novel environment of a new culture and ethical system; 2) empathy with individuals that have differences based on cultural ethnicity, and 3) development of human capacity for competitiveness in global agriculture.

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BIOLOGY

Science in EcuadorEngage Children in Science: International Experience
Project head(s): Catherine Woodward (Institute for Biology Education); Dolly Ledin (Institute for Biology Education)
Project: To develop a new section of the “Engage Children in Science” course that will provide students with a four-week summer service-learning experience in Ecuador. Students will extend and improve science education in the Manabi province while enhancing their global awareness and gaining an international perspective on science and science education.
Course(s) impacted:
Biology 375: Engage Children in Science
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an understanding of global environmental systems, issues, processes, and how they impact local environmental and science education; 2) demonstrate an appreciation for the impact of cultural/societal differences on scientific understanding; 3) apply and adapt knowledge of prior STEM coursework and research to science inquiry-based teaching in an international context; 4) learn to use strategies appropriate for meeting the learning needs of diverse audiences in a global context; 5) gain cultural sensitivity and leadership skills; 6) assess student learning in science within the local social and environmental context; 7) use reflective writing and community engagement to connect one’s individual science studies to one’s life and to the global community; 8) demonstrate understanding of the similarities and differences between the U.S. and rural Ecuador in pressing scientific problems and processes, content knowledge, and science teaching and learning.

BOTANY

Ecuadorian Herbal Medicine Use: Botany and Cross-Cultural Health 
Project head(s): David Kiefer (Family Medicine); Eve Emshwiller (Botany)
Project: To develop and implement an interactive, online case study about the use of medicinal plant use in Ecuador, compared to Spanish-speaking people in Madison, WI.
Students will learn about commonly-used medicinal plants from both Amazonian Ecuador and highland Ecuador, including taxonomy, phytochemistry, preparation techniques, and how the use of medicinal plants fit in with views on health, healing, and other aspects of international culture and cosmology.
In addition, to apply these concepts locally, the case will follow a hypothetical family after they emigrate to Madison, and how their medicinal plant use changes. Madison botánicas, or herbal stores, and medical clinics will be discussed as the family continues to weave their ethnobotanical traditions into a new environment.
The case will be developed using the Engage Case Scenario/Critical Reader tool.
Course(s) impacted: Botany/Anthropology/American Indian Studies 474: Ethnobotany.
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) demonstrate an understanding of  the botanical and phytochemical underpinnings of commonly used medicinal plants from the regions discussed; 2) identify the factors involved in the use of herbal medicines in a foreign country as compared to an immigrant population, including selection, sourcing, and preparation of medicinal plants, communication of herbal medicine use with health professionals, and the underlying cosmology and belief systems that govern plants’ role in a particular culture; 3) illustrate the importance of interdisciplinary research and collaboration in a field such as ethnobotany, which has complex, interacting factors.

International Food Security and Environmental Conservation in Botany and Plant Pathology
Project head(s): Caitilyn Allen (Plant Pathology), Don Waller (Botany)
Project: To develop a new three-credit, 500-level course to examine the tension between agriculture and the conservation of environmental resources by using case studies from the American Midwest and Guatemala. The class will meet jointly via videoconferencing with an equivalent course offered at the University of San Carlos de Guatemala (USAC). These weekly 90-minute class sessions will be followed with a field trip in Guatemala with the partner class from USAC.
The course will be team-taught with UW-Madison Professors Caitilyn Allen, Don Waller, and Professor José Pablo Prado (Agronomy) at the USAC. Professor Prado is a Tinker Fellow through UW-Madison’s Latin American Caribbean and Iberian Studies (LACIS) program from January 2012 to June 2012.
Course(s) impacted:
Plant Pathology/Botany 123: Plants, Parasites, and People; a new 3-cr., 500-level course cross listed between the departments of Botany and Plant Pathology
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) develop critical thinking skills at the interface of biology, policy, and culture; 2) learn specific content about crop production and conservation biology in the developing tropics; 3) appreciate the universal and culture-specific aspects of these topics, and; 4) gain familiarity with the complex mixture of human cultures and natural and man-made landscapes in Latin America.

Strengthening Undergraduate Environmental Studies with International Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation
Project head(s): Adrian Treves (Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies)
Project: To develop and integrate international, comparative case studies into three undergraduate courses that focus on ecology and the conservation of biodiversity. Case studies will illuminate cultural differences in the meaning and use of wildlife, carnivore conservation, assumptions about indigenous stewardship, etc.
This project also entails expanding an online learning simulation of wolf hunting in Wisconsin to include Sweden as a comparative case.
Course(s) impacted:
Environmental Studies 600: Large Carnivore Conservation in Wisconsin and around the World; Environmental Studies 651: Conservation Biology; Botany/Zoology/Environmental Studies 260: Introduction to Ecology
Global learning outcomes:
“My desired global learning outcomes are to help our undergraduates become informed citizens of the world who can place U.S. environmental problems in a global context and devise wiser, more sustainable solutions by translating and combining insights from many regions to create novel solutions to environmental problems. Such intellectual and creative capacities will demand familiarity with events, systems, successes, and failures in other countries. In the course of such instruction and mentorship, I expect undergraduates and my mentees to gain a better understanding of how science is done in other countries.”

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DAIRY SCIENCE

Understanding Sustainability: The Economic, Environmental, and Social Outcomes of Family Farms in Jalisco, Mexico. 
Project head(s): Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)
Project: To develop and implement an online, interactive case study that will provide students with a “real world” scenario of farm management in Jalisco state. The scenario will emphasize the manage of the whole farm system, including socio-economic factors, rather than the management of specific farm components. The case will help students explore ways to improve management practices of livestock (dairy) operations based on a sound understanding of balance and flow of nutrients as a continuum among the soil, plants, and animals that make up the biophysical resources of a farm.
Course(s) impacted: Dairy Science/Animal Sciences/Soil Science/Environmental Studies 468: Environmental Management of Livestock Operations
Global learning outcomes: Students will be expected to demonstrate an increased awareness and understanding of: 1) contrasting roles and contributions of livestock agriculture in Mexico and the U.S.; 2) the factors that impact the management of a whole farm. They will also gain: 1) an increased ability for integrative learning and an appreciation of the scientific tools used in different countries to assess the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, including indicators of human and animal health; 2) a capacity for inquiry, analysis, and problem solving in sustainable agriculture, and; 3) higher levels of motivation and interest in seeking out additional opportunities to engage further in studies (and experiential learning) of international agricultural issues.

Trans-National Issues in Sustainable Rural Development, Food Systems, and Poverty Alleviation with an Emphasis on Interdependencies
Project head(s): Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)
Project:
To research and develop comparative case studies of Mexican and Wisconsin dairy farming that will be developed as online, multi-media rich, interactive learning materials. Case studies will be integrated into three different courses, engaging a range of students in an in-depth comparative analysis of social, economic, and environmental indicators of sustainability using scientific integrative tools.
Course(s) impacted:
Dairy Science 375: Agriculture in Emerging Economies: Dairying in Mexico; Inter-Ag 155: Issues in Agriculture, Environment, and Life Sciences; Inter-Ag 165: Introduction to International Issues in Agricultural & Life Sciences
Global learning outcomes:
Students will be expected to demonstrate an increased awareness and understanding of: 1) contrasting roles and contributions of livestock agriculture in Mexico and the U.S.; 2) the interdependencies that exist in agriculture between Mexico and the U.S.; 3) the role and position of the U.S. in agriculture around the world. They will also gain: 1) an increased ability for integrative learning and an appreciation of the scientific tools used in different countries to assess the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, including indicators of human and animal health; 2) a capacity for inquiry, analysis, and problem solving in sustainable agriculture, and; 3) higher levels of motivation and interest in seeking out additional opportunities to engage further in studies (and experiential learning) of international agricultural issues.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Understanding Sustainability: The Economic, Environmental, and Social Outcomes of Family Farms in Jalisco, Mexico. 
Project head(s): Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)
Project: To develop and implement an online, interactive case study that will provide students with a “real world” scenario of farm management in Jalisco state. The scenario will emphasize the manage of the whole farm system, including socio-economic factors, rather than the management of specific farm components. The case will help students explore ways to improve management practices of livestock (dairy) operations based on a sound understanding of balance and flow of nutrients as a continuum among the soil, plants, and animals that make up the biophysical resources of a farm.
Course(s) impacted: Dairy Science/Animal Sciences/Soil Science/Environmental Studies 468: Environmental Management of Livestock Operations
Global learning outcomes: Students will be expected to demonstrate an increased awareness and understanding of: 1) contrasting roles and contributions of livestock agriculture in Mexico and the U.S.; 2) the factors that impact the management of a whole farm. They will also gain: 1) an increased ability for integrative learning and an appreciation of the scientific tools used in different countries to assess the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, including indicators of human and animal health; 2) a capacity for inquiry, analysis, and problem solving in sustainable agriculture, and; 3) higher levels of motivation and interest in seeking out additional opportunities to engage further in studies (and experiential learning) of international agricultural issues.

Strengthening Undergraduate Environmental Studies with International Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation
Project head(s): Adrian Treves (Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies)
Project: To develop and integrate international, comparative case studies into three undergraduate courses that focus on ecology and the conservation of biodiversity. Case studies will illuminate cultural differences in the meaning and use of wildlife, carnivore conservation, assumptions about indigenous stewardship, etc.
This project also entails expanding an online learning simulation of wolf hunting in Wisconsin to include Sweden as a comparative case.
Course(s) impacted:
Environmental Studies 600: Large Carnivore Conservation in Wisconsin and around the World; Environmental Studies 651: Conservation Biology; Botany/Zoology/Environmental Studies 260: Introduction to Ecology
Global learning outcomes:
“My desired global learning outcomes are to help our undergraduates become informed citizens of the world who can place U.S. environmental problems in a global context and devise wiser, more sustainable solutions by translating and combining insights from many regions to create novel solutions to environmental problems. Such intellectual and creative capacities will demand familiarity with events, systems, successes, and failures in other countries. In the course of such instruction and mentorship, I expect undergraduates and my mentees to gain a better understanding of how science is done in other countries.”

FOOD SCIENCE

The Internationalization of Food Sciences at UW-Madison
Project head(s): Monica Theis (Food Science)
Project: To integrate concepts of global awareness into two entry-level Food Science courses and to develop a new course that provides food science undergraduates with an international travel experience.
Beginning in spring 2012, “Food Science 201: Careers in Food Science” and “Food Science 321: Food Law and Regulations” will provide students with a broader understanding of the profession of food science by situating domestic practice within a global context. Issues addressed in the two courses will include: the role of the food scientist in multinational companies; the importance of global awareness; food safety; trade; and marketing.
Also in spring 2012, a new course, “Food Science 375: Food and Culture: An Exploration of the Social Implications of a Global Food Supply,” will introduce students to sociocultural issues and their influence on the profession of food science from a global perspective. Potential topics will include: immigration; hunger; food security; and food rituals; traditions; and health. Activities will include trips to local markets and restaurants, learning from visiting speakers, and “chef-in-the-classroom” culinary adventures.
Students in this course will also have the option to travel to central Mexico to learn more about the agricultural and food industries there.
Course(s) impacted:
Food Science 201: Careers in Food Science; Food Science 321: Food Law and Regulations; and development of a new course, Food Science 375: Food and Culture: An Exploration of the Social Implications of a Global Food Supply
Global learning outcomes:
Course offerings and travel opportunities will provide students with the opportunity to: 1) understand the field of food science within the global context and compare application of food science in the U.S. with other countries; 2) identify and explore political, economic, and social issues, trends, and processes common to the food industry and food systems throughout the world, and; 3) compare the work of a food scientist from the U.S. with a peer in a different country.

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FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY

Deer stalking in ScottlandEuropean Approaches to the Conservation of Roe Deer, the Ecological Correlate of North America’s White-Tailed Deer
Project head(s): Tim Van Deelan (Forest & Wildlife Ecology)
Project: To produce and integrate three week-long teaching modules that address European approaches to deer impacts on forests, agriculture, and urban and rural areas into a senior capstone course in Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology. By offering a global perspective to a local issue (deer management in Wisconsin), the teaching modules will provide interdisciplinary problem-solving opportunities and structured debate regarding the feasibility of using European approaches to manage similar conservation issues with deer in Wisconsin.
Course(s) impacted:
3-credit FW ECOL 375 : Special Topics/Complexity and Conservation of White-tailed Deer (requesting new course status to FW ECOL 577)
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an understanding of the field of wildlife management within a comparative and international context; 2) demonstrate knowledge of global issues related to overabundant large herbivores and the cultural constraints on management; 3) demonstrate substantial knowledge of the similarities and differences among natural resource managers from different countries.

HORTICULTURE

Integrating International Practices into Horticulture 120: Survey of Horticulture
Project head(s): Sara E. Patterson (Horticulture)
Project: To establish an Italian Garden section in the Eagle Heights demonstration gardens during the summer of 2012 for integration into lectures and lab modules in the Department of Horticulture. In addition to providing students with a hands-on opportunity to learn about the usage of herbs and spices from a cultural perspective, including members of the compositaceae and labiaceae families, the Italian Garden section will also demonstrate diverse methods in mulching, composting, and other sustainable gardening practices. This module will later be developed into a capstone opportunity.
Course(s) impacted:
Hort 120 Survey of Horticulture; Hort 334 & 335; Hort 263; Hort 372; Hort 345
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an appreciation and understanding of horticultural food products and current usage within a greater historical and global context with emphasis on food crops from the Mediterranean (Fertile Crescent); 2) learn cultural and global perspectives on crop development and climate;  3) understand horticultural practices used in Tuscany, Italy providing cultural and historical perspective on “sustainability” and organic gardening;  4) gain a broader global perspective on role of plants in the world and our responsibilities as humans to respect our resources.

INTEGRATED LIBERAL STUDIES

Science for a World Lived in Common
Project head(s): Basil Tikoff (Geoscience); Cathy Middlecamp (Chemistry)
Project: To support the syllabi redesign and develop new teaching materials that internationalize the three-course integrated science sequence entitled “Science Illuminated,” with concentration on the final course “Predicting the Future.” The international content in the courses include: 1) How cultural differences are (and are not) reflected in scientific inquiry; and 2) How effects of major predicted global changes (climate change, species loss) vary worldwide; and how these unequal effects result in differences in perspective on scientific issues.
Course(s) impacted:
Integrated Liberal Studies 251, 252, and 253: Science Illuminated
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an appreciation of the way science and scientific predictions are treated in different societies; 2) assess how global phenomenon (e.g. global warming) have different physical, biological, and social effects in different regions; 3) understand how and why international scientific collaboration works so effectively; and 4) learn examples in which scientists in different parts of the world pursue different scientific goals or approaches.

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Developing the Costa Rica Cloud Forest Studio
Project head(s): John A. Harrington (Landscape Architecture); Sam Dennis (Landscape Architecture)
Project: To establish the Costa Rica Cloud Forest Studio as a long-term site for an international service learning experience in Monteverde, Costa Rica. The studio will help the Cloud Forest School by providing guidance for reforestation of disturbed areas, mapping onsite resources, and by making the school grounds available to students and local citizens for environmental education.
Although our students explore the social and ecological roles of landscape architecture within North America, few have exposure to the global ecology and cultures.  The Cloud Forest Studio seeks to have students understand the ecology of the forest systems in the Tilarán Mountain region of Costa Rica, along with the Costa Rican cultural attitudes toward these forested lands and environmental education.
The studio will also seek to help students look for innovative ways to protect forest resources while still allowing for needed development.
Course(s) impacted:
1-cr Landscape Architecture 375: Costa Rica Cloud Forest Studio/ 2-cr. Winter break service learning course
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) demonstrate an understanding of the role and capacity of landscape architecture and planning to support ecological restoration within a global social context; 2) demonstrate a knowledge of forest loss and the consequences it has both regionally and globally; 3) demonstrate substantial knowledge of the similarities and differences in restoration and reforestation occurring in North America and Latin America; 4) learn specific content about reforestation methods, including best practices; 5) gain an understanding of the political, social and economic forces that promote or constrain environmental policies in Costa Rica.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Integrating International Experiences into Mechanical Engineering 363, Fluid Dynamics Course
Project head(s): John Pfotenhauer (Mechanical Engineering); R.L. Engelstad (Mechanical Engineering)
Project: To establish a summer session course in fluid dynamics for UW–Madison engineering undergraduates at the University of Agder in Grimstad, Norway. This program has as its model a similar summer session mechanical engineering course presently taught in China and will prompt students to recognize the similar and distinct ways in which their international peers approach engineering problems.
Course(s) impacted:
Mechanical Engineering 363: Fluid Dynamics
Global learning outcomes:
Students will recognize the similar and distinct ways in which their international peers approach engineering problems, and the ways in which the local necessity for, and application of, the engineering skills are alike and different from those in the United States.

NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES

Internationalizing Nutrition Education Counseling
Project head(s): Lynette Karls (Nutritional Science)
Project: To research and develop an entirely new one-credit course that will be required for all Dietetics majors. The course on education and counseling will integrate cultural competencies in regards to racial, ethnic, and international communities.
Course(s) impacted:
Nutritional Sciences 522: Nutrition Education and Counseling
Global learning outcomes:
One of the major aspects of this course is to provide students with cultural competence as nutrition educators and counselors. Cultural competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enable effective work in cross-cultural situations.

International Careers in Community Nutrition
Project head(s): Betsy Kelly (Nutritional Sciences)
Project: To produce a video on the international experiences that three nutritional scientists have had in Cambodia, Guatemala, and Ecuador. The goal of the video is to highlight the ways in which these professionals’ international experiences have contributed to their careers and enhanced their understanding of nutritional sciences more generally. The video will be available online on a professional development Web site and UW-Madison undergraduate students will access it as part of a larger project that demonstrates the various careers available to graduates of the program.
Course(s) impacted:
Nutritional Sciences 200/Food Science 200: Professions of Dietetics and Nutrition

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PLANT PATHOLOGY

Allen teachingInternational Food Security and Environmental Conservation in Botany and Plant Pathology
Project head(s): Caitilyn Allen (Plant Pathology), Don Waller (Botany)
Project: To develop a new three-credit, 500-level course to examine the tension between agriculture and the conservation of environmental resources by using case studies from the American Midwest and Guatemala. The class will meet jointly via videoconferencing with an equivalent course offered at the University of San Carlos de Guatemala (USAC). These weekly 90-minute class sessions will be followed with a field trip in Guatemala with the partner class from USAC.
The course will be team-taught with UW-Madison Professors Caitilyn Allen, Don Waller, and Professor José Pablo Prado (Agronomy) at the USAC. Professor Prado is a Tinker Fellow through UW-Madison’s Latin American Caribbean and Iberian Studies (LACIS) program from January 2012 to June 2012.
Course(s) impacted:
Plant Pathology/Botany 123: Plants, Parasites, and People; a new 3-cr., 500-level course cross listed between the departments of Botany and Plant Pathology
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) develop critical thinking skills at the interface of biology, policy, and culture; 2) learn specific content about crop production and conservation biology in the developing tropics; 3) appreciate the universal and culture-specific aspects of these topics, and; 4) gain familiarity with the complex mixture of human cultures and natural and man-made landscapes in Latin America.

First-Year Interest Group: Global Food Security
Project head(s): Jeri Barak (Plant Pathology); Suzanne Dove (CIBER)
Project: Project: To host two visiting international experts to speak about international the aspects of global food security. The first speaker will address the global impact of rising food prices. The second will represent a U.S. agribusiness company and will discuss public-private partnerships to help achieve sustainable agricultural development in world regions.
Course(s) impacted:

Course(s) impacted: Plant Pathology 375: Global Food Security (First-year Interest Group)
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) gain an understanding of the role of the science of food and agriculture in the context of agricultural development; 2) learn the trends and systems that drive the complex global food chain. By the end of the course students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the cause of global food insecurity; awareness of the public, private, and not-for-profit organizations engaged in this problem; and recognition of possible solutions to food insecurity.

SOIL SCIENCE

Internationalization of Soil Science 325: Pedology
Project head(s): Alfred Hartemink (Soil Science); Annatasia Tapsieva (Soil Science)
Project: To revise the course on soil formation, morphology, and mapping to give students an appreciation of the different perspectives and methodologies of international soil classification systems (beyond the USDA Soil Taxonomy) and illustrate the complex decision-making process involved in soil classification and mapping.
A familiarity with differing classification systems can better prepare scientists to work in international projects and in global consortia developing worldwide digital soil databases.
During the fall of 2012, visiting professor Pavel Krasilnikov of Moscow State University will deliver lectures and case studies on the subject which will be captured by video and incorporated into successive courses.
Course(s) impacted:
Soil Science 325: Pedology
Global learning outcomes:
Students will: 1) appreciate how soils differ across the landscape, in the state of the Wisconsin, in the USA, and globally and the ways in which naming and classification of soil provides a language for discussing such diversity; 2) become familiar with perspectives and methodologies of international soil classification systems; 3) develop an appreciation for the advantages and disadvantages of the different international soil classification systems; 4) become away of the complex decision‐making process involved in soil classification and mapping which may lead to a deeper understanding of the US taxonomy system.

Understanding Sustainability: The Economic, Environmental, and Social Outcomes of Family Farms in Jalisco, Mexico. 
Project head(s): Michel Wattiaux (Dairy Science)
Project: To develop and implement an online, interactive case study that will provide students with a “real world” scenario of farm management in Jalisco state. The scenario will emphasize the manage of the whole farm system, including socio-economic factors, rather than the management of specific farm components. The case will help students explore ways to improve management practices of livestock (dairy) operations based on a sound understanding of balance and flow of nutrients as a continuum among the soil, plants, and animals that make up the biophysical resources of a farm.
Course(s) impacted: Dairy Science/Animal Sciences/Soil Science/Environmental Studies 468: Environmental Management of Livestock Operations
Global learning outcomes: Students will be expected to demonstrate an increased awareness and understanding of: 1) contrasting roles and contributions of livestock agriculture in Mexico and the U.S.; 2) the factors that impact the management of a whole farm. They will also gain: 1) an increased ability for integrative learning and an appreciation of the scientific tools used in different countries to assess the sustainability of agro-ecosystems, including indicators of human and animal health; 2) a capacity for inquiry, analysis, and problem solving in sustainable agriculture, and; 3) higher levels of motivation and interest in seeking out additional opportunities to engage further in studies (and experiential learning) of international agricultural issues.

ZOOLOGY

Integration of International Scientific Research and Exchange of Multiple Cultural Perspectives to Meet the Challenges of Avian Conservation
Project head(s): Mark E. Berres (Animal Sciences)
Project: To develop a new undergraduate course in ornithology and to develop and integrate a case study of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole. The newly developed course, Animal Sciences 375: Advance Topics in Ornithology, will provide a seminar of undergraduates with in-depth exposure to a specific avian conservation research topic, that of the critically endangered Montserrat Oriole.
Using audio data recorded on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles, students will analyze the specific calls, communicate with the scientific research staff at the Montserrat Division of Environment (DoE) and with key members of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, and then map distributional trends using GIS software.
Ultimately students will make conservation recommendations taking into account, among other things, the unique culture found on Montserrat.
These students will then create a 50-minute, multimedia-rich synopsis of the project and present it during one regularly scheduled lecture to students enrolled in Animal Sciences/Zoology 520 and 521.
Course(s) impacted: Animal Sciences/Zoology 520: Ornithology; Animal Sciences/Zoology 521: Birds of Southern Wisconsin; and a new course, Animal Sciences 375: Advanced Topics in Ornithology
Global learning outcomes: A strategic outcome from these interactions will be an ability to identify—and accommodate—differences in the way researchers from three different countries work together toward a common goal.

Strengthening Undergraduate Environmental Studies with International Ecology and Biodiversity Conservation
Project head(s): Adrian Treves (Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies)
Project: To develop and integrate international, comparative case studies into three undergraduate courses that focus on ecology and the conservation of biodiversity. Case studies will illuminate cultural differences in the meaning and use of wildlife, carnivore conservation, assumptions about indigenous stewardship, etc.
This project also entails expanding an online learning simulation of wolf hunting in Wisconsin to include Sweden as a comparative case.
Course(s) impacted:
Environmental Studies 600: Large Carnivore Conservation in Wisconsin and around the World; Environmental Studies 651: Conservation Biology; Botany/Zoology/Environmental Studies 260: Introduction to Ecology
Global learning outcomes:
“My desired global learning outcomes are to help our undergraduates become informed citizens of the world who can place U.S. environmental problems in a global context and devise wiser, more sustainable solutions by translating and combining insights from many regions to create novel solutions to environmental problems. Such intellectual and creative capacities will demand familiarity with events, systems, successes, and failures in other countries. In the course of such instruction and mentorship, I expect undergraduates and my mentees to gain a better understanding of how science is done in other countries.”

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